Dvarapala, Cambodian Buddhist Temple Guardian 16"
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Dvarapala, Cambodian Buddhist Temple Guardian 16" Item #2c94

Materials: Monkey Pod Wood, Samanea Saman

Origin: Hand Carved in Cambodia

Height: 16 inches

Width: 10 inches

Depth: 8 inches

Weight: 9 pounds

Price: $210

Sale Price: $189



Description

Dvarapalas (temple lions) traditionally stand guard outside the gates of shrines, Buddhist temples and porticos of homes. In Japan, they are referred to as Shishi (or Jishi) and can also refer to a deer or dog with magical properties and the power to repel evil spirits. In China they are referred to as Foo Dogs and are traditionally depicted in pairs. In Thailand they are referred to as Singha, the true king of the forest. His roar echoes to great distances, terrifying all forest animals, great and small, and stand at the entrance of Thai temples, guarding the sacred Buddhist teachings. In Indonesia and Cambodia they are referred to as 'Dvarapalas' and are generally armed with lances and clubs and can often times have a bulky physique. The main function of Dvarapalas is to protect the temples. Dvarapalas in Cambodia may be seen, for example, at various temples in and around Angkor Wat.

This wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia. 

NOTE: This statue has a small crack on the left side of the face and the inner left thigh, thus the discounted price.

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