Buddhist Alms Bowl, Patra

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Soon after Shakyamuni Buddha attained enlightenment the four great Great Guardian Kings of the four directions each presented him with an alms-bowl, the most beautiful of which was made of precious gems and the simplest from common clay.  Shakyamuni was said to have either chosen the simple clay bowl or to have accepted all four bowls and miraculously convert them into one plain bowl that was sufficient for the needs of a humble mendicant.

The traditional alms bowl of a Buddhist monk or bhikshu is shaped like the inverted head protuberance (Skt. ushnisha) of the Buddha, a symbols of the highest attainment of Buddhahood, as the wisdom the directly realizes emptiness.  The alms bowl is generally held in the left “wisdom” hand of seated Buddhas and their disciples, the sangha.  This left hand often rest upon the lap in the gesture of meditation, with the alms bowl indicating renunciation and the hand gesture meditation upon emptiness.

Three fruits or gems, representing the trinity of Buddha, dharma and sangha, are also commonly depicted in an alms bowl.  The specific attribute of a particular Buddha may also be shown in his alms bowl.

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Standing Khmer Bronze Buddha Statue

Standing Khmer Bronze Buddha Statue

Lord Buddha is depicted standing holding an alms bowl.

Soon after Shakyamuni Buddha attained enlightenment the four great Great Guardian Kings of the four directions each presented him with an alms-bowl, the most beautiful of which was made of precious gems and the simplest from common clay.  Shakyamuni was said to have either chosen the simple clay bowl or to have accepted all four bowls and miraculously convert them into one plain bowl that was sufficient for the needs of a humble mendicant.

The traditional alms bowl of a Buddhist monk or bhikshu is shaped like the inverted head protuberance (Skt. ushnisha) of the Buddha, a symbol of the highest attainment of Buddhahood, as the wisdom that directly realizes emptiness.

Rose & Saffron Tones Khmer Buddha Statue

rose saffron tones khmer buddha statue

This beautiful rose with saffron tones Cambodian Buddha statue was recently carved from an antique piece of wood. Lord Buddha has a wonderful serene expression and a faint smile. He is depicted in the bhumisparsha mudra also known as the earth touching gesture. The ushnisha, protuberance above his head also referred to as a topknot, symbolizes His wisdom and openness as an enlightened being. He has elongated earlobes, a vestige of his life as a prince, when he wore extravagant jewelry. This beautiful wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia!

Buddha Abhaya Mudra, Cambodian Wood Statue

 Abhaya Mudra Buddha Statue

Lord Buddha’s hand is held up in abhaya mudra also known as the gesture of protection. The ushnisha, protuberance above his head also referred to as a topknot, symbolizes His wisdom and openness as an enlightened being. The Buddha is always depicted with elongated earlobes, a vestige of his life as a prince, when he wore extravagant jewelry. This wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia.

Parinirvana Buddha Statue

hand carved parinirvana buddha statue

This Buddha sculpture is shown in Parinirvana. In Buddhism, Parinirvana is the final nirvana, usually within reach only upon the death of the body of someone who has attained complete awakening or bodhi. It is the ultimate goal of Buddhist practice and implies a release from the cycle of deaths and rebirths as well as the dissolution of all worldly physical and mental aggregates or skandhas (perception or consciousness). Lord Buddha is shown resting peacefully. His eyes and face have a serene demeanor showing Siddhartha at ease with passing from this world escaping from the cycle of samsara.

Abhaya Mudra Standing Buddha, Balinese Wood Statue

large standing balinese buddha

This beautifully serene Balinese wood Buddha stands on an intricately carved three-tiered lotus base. Lord Buddha’s right hand is raised in the abhaya mudra also known as the gesture of protection. In his left hand he holds a small vessel which in both Buddhism and Hinduism alike is said to contain amrita, the divine nectar of the gods which was also believed to have healing properties.

This Buddha is carved from the trunk of a rain-tree. The natural gradation of the wood from dark to light color throughout this piece is stunning! Only master artisans are experienced enough to carve full tree carvings. The artist must have a very keen eye in order to see the contour and shape of the tree and bring life to it. The back of this sculpture is also fully carved. This sculpture was entirely hand carved in the living postcard island of Bali.

Buddha Vitarka Mudra, Cambodian Wood Statue

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This natural color macassar ebony wood Buddha statue is in the vitarka mudra also known as the teaching gesture. Lord Buddha is seated in dhyana asana, the meditative pose also called padmasana. A beautiful Buddharupa, perfect for a home altar or meditation room. This wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia.

Kneeling Buddha Burmese Wood Statue with Glass Mosaic, 13″

Kneeling Burmese Wood Buddha Statue with Glass Mosaic

Lord Buddha’s face exudes an intense sweetness and serenity. A slight, enigmatic smile plays across his lips. Long, pendulous earlobes reach down to touch his shoulders. This beautiful kneeling Buddha is inlaid with red, green and silver glass mosaic. This teak wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Myanmar (Burma).

Golden Teaching Mudra Buddha Statue

Golden Teaching Mudra Buddha Statue

This Khmer golden Buddha statue is in the vitarka mudra which is interpreted as the hand gesture that evokes the energy of teaching and intellectual discussion or argument. It is said that it mostly feels like the transmission of a particular teaching with no words and that the circle formed by the thumb and index finger create a constant flow of energy and information.

Amitabha Torana Dvara Statue

amitabha copper statue

 

Amitabha is seated against a richly decorated torana dvara or “arch gateway” decorated with the familiar figure of Kirtimukha, a mythical animal holding snakes and two makaras, along with figures of horses and elephants. Accompanying them are three Chaityas which adorn the top of the arch/gate. He is dressed in clothes of royalty. The protuberance on the top of his head denotes superb mental acuity and his long earlobes denote superb perception.