Hand Painted Copper Shakyamuni Buddha Statue


This is lovely rendition of Shakyamuni Buddha! Lord Buddha has a serene expression and a hypnotizing gaze in his eyes.

The Buddha Shakyamuni, at the moment of enlightenment, invoked the earth as witness, as indicated by the fingers of his right hand, which spread downward in bhumisparsha mudra, “the earth touching gesture”. As the Buddhist sutras narrate, the sun and moon stood still, and all the creatures of the world came to offer respect to the Supreme One who had broken through the boundaries of egocentric existence. All Buddhist art celebrates this moment and leads the viewer toward the Buddha’s experience of selfless and unsurpassed enlightenment.

Buddhist art pictures the Buddha in numerous manifestations, but always as a model of human potential, never as a historically identifiable person. All forms of the Buddha, however, are commonly shown seated on a lotus throne (as seen here), a symbol of the mind’s transcendent nature.

“Be a light unto yourself,” Buddha Shakyamuni declared at the end of his life. Become a Buddha, an awakened being, he urged, but never a blind follower of tradition.

This Buddha statue has the distinguishing marks that designate his celestial status, such as the cranial bump (ushnisha) and the conspicuous mark in the middle of his forehead (urna). He wears a distinctive robe elaborately decorated with elegant flowing floral motifs. In the back of the base is the wheel and deer emblem. The Buddhist emblem of a golden eight-spoked wheel flanked by two deer represents the Buddha’s first discourse, which he gave in the Deer Park at Sarnath, near Varanasi. This discourse is known as the ‘first turning of the wheel of dharma’, when the Buddha taught the doctrines of the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Noble Path to five Indian mendicants.

As a symbol of the Buddha’s teachings a gilded three-dimensional wheel and deer emblem is traditionally placed at the front of monastery and temple roofs, from here it shines as a crowning symbol of the Buddhadharma. This emblem similarly appears over the four gateways of the divine mandala palace.

There are 2 separate pieces to this statue: the Buddha and its double lotus base. This copper statue is fully gold plated with 24k gold and then hand painted. The face of the Buddha is painted with a 24k gold mixture. The gold is crushed into a powder and then made into a paste. The gold paste is mixed with an organic paint mixture then used to paint the most important part of any Buddha statue; the face.

Buddhist Alms Bowl, Patra

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Soon after Shakyamuni Buddha attained enlightenment the four great Great Guardian Kings of the four directions each presented him with an alms-bowl, the most beautiful of which was made of precious gems and the simplest from common clay.  Shakyamuni was said to have either chosen the simple clay bowl or to have accepted all four bowls and miraculously convert them into one plain bowl that was sufficient for the needs of a humble mendicant.

The traditional alms bowl of a Buddhist monk or bhikshu is shaped like the inverted head protuberance (Skt. ushnisha) of the Buddha, a symbols of the highest attainment of Buddhahood, as the wisdom the directly realizes emptiness.  The alms bowl is generally held in the left “wisdom” hand of seated Buddhas and their disciples, the sangha.  This left hand often rest upon the lap in the gesture of meditation, with the alms bowl indicating renunciation and the hand gesture meditation upon emptiness.

Three fruits or gems, representing the trinity of Buddha, dharma and sangha, are also commonly depicted in an alms bowl.  The specific attribute of a particular Buddha may also be shown in his alms bowl.

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Tibetan Mani, Buddhist Prayer Wheel, 9.5″

2 Tibetan Prayer Wheel

This prayer wheel is decorated with beautiful shades of fiery red and turquoise. The cylinder contains a tightly wound scroll with the sacred text printed on paper. The text is a sutra or invocation to Avalokiteshvara. The syllables Om Mani Padme Hum are carved outside the wheel in Tibetan. Prayer wheels are used primarily by the Buddhists of Tibet and Nepal, where hand held prayer wheels are carried by pilgrims and other devotees and turned during devotional activities. This prayer wheel is handmade in Nepal and is excellent addition to your Buddhist accessories or as a gift for anyone who practices meditation. It is both a spiritual tool and work of art!

Green Tara Statue, Tibetan Dolma, 9″

Tibetan Dolma, Green Tara Statue 9"

Green Tara embodies the Earth element. She is a powerful goddess, a bodhisattva in female form who helps us to overcome both material and spiritual obstacles.

This beautiful statue embodies Green Tara’s deep visceral connection to the Mother Earth. Here she is seated in the pose of ease (lalita asana), her right hand is shown in varada mudra (boon-granting gesture) because she is quick to respond to the petitions of those who seek her aid. Both her right and left hands gracefully hold full blooming lotuses. Lotuses are symbols of purity and spontaneous generation and hence symbolize divine birth. This piece is an exceptional find, a goddess in the simplicity of her power and radiance!

This statue is made of copper and is inlaid with coral and turquoise. Her ankle length dhoti is engraved with floral motifs. She sits on a single lotus base with broad petals. Located on the lower backside of the statue you will find an engraved wheel and deer emblem representing the natural harmony and fearlessness of the deity’s pure realm.

This sculpture was handcrafted in Patan, Nepal by master artisans of the Shakya clan who are considered among the best in the world. These craftsmen are the modern heirs to a centuries-old tradition of creating sacred art for use in temples and monasteries. The fine metalworking techniques have been passed down from generation to generation since ancient times.

This sculpture was handcrafted by the very talented artists of Nepal.

Tibetan Buddhist Sage, Milarepa Statue 6″

tibetan buddhist milarepa

Milarepa is held in the highest esteem by all Tibetans as the archetypal yogi. His heroic quest for knowledge is legendary. He is renowned for his ecstatic verse and in this image, his parted lips suggest the singing of songs for which he is famed throughout Tibet. His left hand is held up towards his ear, often interpreted as the gesture of listening to the songs of nature or the teachings of the masters. His half-closed eyes suggest a state of reverie. He wears large hoop earrings and a meditation strap over his right shoulder passing beneath his cloak. He is seated on an antelope skin draped over the base of the statue.

Tara Standing Statue Tibetan Dolma 26″

Tara Standing Statue Tibetan Dolma

Tara was born from a tear of the Bodhisattva of compassion, Avalokiteshvara. She holds a very prominent position in Tibetan Buddhism and Nepal. Tara is believed to protect all beings while they are crossing the ocean of existence.